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When you're planning to move and renting a truck, give some thought to the season. Plan around holidays as well as the weather, and you'll have an easier time renting and operating a truck.

Strategically choose your moving season

There are plenty of stresses on moving day, and one of the biggest can be renting a truck. The difficulty of finding and renting a vehicle can be greatly exacerbated depending on what time of year you plan to hit the road. Before moving, give your timing some consideration. That way, you can eliminate some unnecessary stress.

Choosing the right season

Each season poses its own challenges and advantages when deciding to move. Winter can mean cold weather, icy roads and otherwise unfavorable moving conditions. Summer can be sweltering. Hot temperatures not only mean a more exhausting move, but also a potentially difficult drive if you're traveling long distances. An overheated truck might be the last thing you want to deal with when driving cross country. Generally, spring and fall are better times to move, as the weather is more pleasant. However, you'll also want to keep an eye out for popular moving days in your old neighborhood as well as your new one.

The end of spring and the beginning of fall mark some of the busiest moving days of the year, as students move in and out of campus living quarters and shuttle back and forth between college and home. If you now or will soon live in a college town, don't expect getting a moving truck at all at the beginning or end of the school year, let alone renting one at a good price. Instead, look up when classes end in your area and plan to move a few weeks before or after that time. If you have a lease that expires on an inconvenient date, you may not have much flexibility in terms of your move-out time. In that case, still try renting a truck as early as possible, or try to make a reservation with the moving company.

Be aware of holidays

Try to be aware of busy holiday weekends or city events when roads become abnormally clogged. Thanksgiving and the Fourth of July are obvious dates, but research into smaller holidays that might be more popular travel days in specific regions. In New England, for example, Columbus Day weekend is a prime time for travelers to drive to the region in search of changing leaves, making it one of the busiest periods of the year.